BMJ series on migration and health

In partnership with the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), we are excited to launch a new series on migration and health. The first articles are now online.

Anti-immigrant rhetoric permeates today’s political discourse and soaks through much of society. In this highly politicized context, dominated by debates on immigration and border control, understanding and tackling what affects the health of migrants, their families, and communities is often overlooked and underserved. These gaps in understanding the relation between migration and health remain a challenge that policymakers, practitioners, civil society, and researchers must collectively embrace.

The BMJ’s migration health series aims to provide insights and perspectives by researchers, policymakers, practitioners, civil society, and migrants themselves on issues, challenges and complexities in advancing migration health. The series is being developed in collaboration with the UN’s Migration agency (IOM) and the Migration Health and Development Research Network (MHADRI) – a global network of migration health researchers.

Establishing a network of experts – accessibility and availability of medical treatments and medications in countries of origin

The European Asylum Support Office (EASO) helps EU Member States give protection to people in need and provides evidence-based input for EU policymaking and legislation in all areas having a direct or indirect impact on asylum. For us working in the migrant health field, ensuring continuity of care and treatment is critical.

The MedCOI project was established to improve access to Medical Country of Origin Information (MedCOI) for national migration and asylum authorities in Europe. The objective of the project is to provide and share reliable information to national migration and asylum authorities in Europe in order to support accurate and fair decisions in international protection and other migration procedures.

Within the context of the MedCOI project, EASO needs to contract a worldwide network of experts providing accurate information on accessibility and availability of medical treatments and medications in countries of origin. As explained in the “Notice of call for expressions of interest”, experts have to first submit their filled out application form, together with required supporting documents. The application form (annex I) is available on the EASO website. Additional information can be found here.

[Call for applicants] IOM Internship: Migration Health Division

Within the Department of Migration Management (DMM), the Migration Health Division (MHD) has the institutional responsibility to oversee, support and coordinate the Organization’s provision of migration health services globally. The Division provides technical guidance and policy advice, establishes partnerships with relevant governmental, multilateral, civil society and private entities in the domain of migration health, and identifies strategies and programmatic approaches that are informed by agreed policies, evidence, standards and trends in the sector.

The successful candidate will support day-to-day strategic activities and liaison to strengthen the Division’s ability to bridge the needs of migrants and IOM Member States through evidence-based policy activities, and thus to ensure the delivery of equitable, rights-based and accessible migration health programmes and initiatives for its beneficiaries. He/she will be support the Senior Migration Health Policy Advisor in liaising with relevant Divisions/Units in HQ on policy related matters.

More information here

NB
• Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted, and additional enquiries will only be addressed if the candidate is shortlisted.

• Depending on experience and location, IOM provides a monthly stipend to help offset costs. Travel costs will be covered.

• Please consider the cost of living in the Duty Station prior to applying.

• Applications must be submitted by 04 April 2019

[Call for Proposal] Qualitative research on vulnerabilities to and risks of exploitation of Vietnamese migrant workers in the context of international labour migration

In December 2018, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) together with the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), launched a 12-month inception phase of a project that aims to reduce instances of exploitative working conditions, forced labour and debt bondage experienced by Vietnamese women and men migrant workers in the context of international migration. The project is funded by the Global Fund to End Modern Slavery (GFEMS) and co-financing is provided by the IOM Development Fund.

To support preparation and piloting of tools and methodologies under the project, and with the objective of providing evidence on the migration journeys, vulnerabilities and risks to modern slavery of Vietnamese migrant workers, IOM will commission a qualitative research aimed to identify and analyse the risk factors, determinants and conditions of migrant workers’ vulnerability that give rise to exploitation and abuse that can amount to modern slavery. Findings from this research will further inform the project design for the coming years by identifying patterns of migrant worker experiences that need to be disrupted to sustainably reduce instances of modern slavery, including forced labour and human trafficking.

Interested service provider should send an application including a technical and a financial proposal following the attached templates via e-mail to hcmc@iom.int or by post to: IOM Viet Nam, Sub-office in Ho Chi Minh city, 1B Pham Ngoc Thach, District 1, Ho Chi Minh city, Viet Nam, by midnight 10 March 2019 (GMT+7). The application should be titled: “Proposal_Qualitative research on vulnerabilities to and risks of exploitation of Vietnamese migrant workers”.

The technical proposal should include:

  • An organizational profile which provides information about the background and mission of the organization and a list of the pertinent research studies it has successfully completed (including the organization contracting the research)
  • A registration certificate for the organization
  • CVs of the research team leader and key personnel

The financial proposal should include:

  • A detailed breakdown of costs per activity
  • Personnel costs
  • Any other costs relating to the implementation of the tasks outlined under the attached Terms of Reference

For further details of the tasks and requirements, please see the TOR in the attachment

Terms of Reference (TOR)

IOM Technical and Financial Proposal Standard Forms

IOM Proforma contract

[Call for papers] Special Issue: The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations

Special Issue “The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations”

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section “Global Health“.

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2019

 

Guest Editor 

Dr. Helena Legido-Quigley
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Singapore 119077, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: migrant health; patient’s experiences; health systems and policies
Guest Editor 

Dr. Montserrat Gea-Sánchez
GESEC group, Faculty of Nursing and Physiotherapy, University of Lleida. GRECS group, Institute of Biomedial Research in Lleida (IRBLleida). GLOMHI: Global Migration and Health Initiative, University of Toronto
Website 1 | Website 2 | Website 3 | E-Mail
Interests: migrant health; social determinants of health; health systems and services

Dear Colleagues,

In 2018, there were an estimated 1 billion migrants in the world, of whom more than a quarter were international migrants. Furthermore, the number of forcibly displaced migrants worldwide has risen to 65 million, with nearly 26 million refugees and asylum seekers. Whilst international migrants need to access health services in thier migration journey and once they arrive to their new host country, very little is known about the health and health system needs of these populations.

This Special Issue aims to contribute to knowledge and policy design and implementation by providing much needed evidence on international migration. We welcome papers on international migration, including migrant workers in precarious work, refugees, and asylum seekers. We welcome research that focuses on migration movements in high-income countries as well as, and perhaps more importantly, on research focusing on the large migration flows from Global South countries. We encourage papers describing issues pertaining to migrants’ access to healthcare services (covering both infectious and non-communicable diseases); analyzing migrants’ social and health inequalities; exploring the ways in which international, national and local organizations are addressing migrant health; and the implications of such movements on public policy and population health. Papers should focus on research and interventions that focus on barriers to be overcome, including aspects related to migrants themselves such as cultural norms and gender roles, as well as focusing on the broader regulatory and legal frameworks. We also welcome research that describes positive inititives that are currently taking place to address the needs of migrants whilst also accounting for the differences in context.

This Special Issue seeks quantitative and qualitative studies as well as mixed-methods studies. High-quality systematic reviews will be also considered. We especially welcome research projects that adopt a multisectoral and multidisplinary approach.

Dr. Helena Legido-Quigley
Dr. Montserrat Gea-Sánchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Migrants
  • Refugees
  • Asylum seekers
  • Migrant health
  • Access to health care
  • Health inequalities
  • Health systems
  • Social determinants of health
  • Policy analysis
  • Multidisciplinary research
  • Systematic review
  • Qualitative research
  • Quantitative research

Reflecting on migration health in 2018

27th December 2018

Dear MHADRI network member,

It is the time of the year to reflect back on migration health in 2018.

We have been fortunate to have many highlights in migration health this year.  The adoption of the Global Compact for Migration and the release of the UCL-Lancet commission on Migration and Health have been monumental events.  Additionally, there is the increasing recognition of the importance of migration and health as reflected by the success of the World Congress on Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Health (MERH), the International Conference on Migration Health, the CESSMIR conference on Needs and Care Practices for Migrants and Refugees, the ISTM International Conference on Migration and Health, and the WHO Summer School on Refugee and Migrant Health to name a few.  MHADRI members have made significant contributions to these important events and continue to help shape the area of migration health.

There remain ongoing challenges in our field of research.  In this increasing polarized and politicized world, we have the ongoing challenge to communicate the importance of migration and health and the importance of migration health as a field of inquiry.   Even when we have been successful in our research, there is significant advocacy and work that is required to ensure that migration health research is effectively utilized in policy.

Our MHADRI network has grown by leaps and bounds with our membershipnow numbering almost 200 from across the globe!  We have successfully launched our website mhadri.org, social media platforms, and quarterly newsletters.  We aim to be the place for migration health researchers to go to keep up to date, connect with other researchers, and advance evidence informed migration health policies.

Our member publications are another way to showcase and publicize the important work that you do.  Please continue to send us your publications.  We have also started to post member profiles to put a face to our growing community and to showcase the diversity of paths and work that we do. MHADRI intern Holly McCarthy has undertaken an initial scoping exercisewhich highlights that MHADRI members are hopeful about the role such a network can play in addressing current gaps in migration and health research globally.

Stay tuned for new exciting MHADRI initiatives in the New Year!

We have had the great fortune to meet many of you in person at various meetings and events over the past year.  With our growing network, we recognize the importance of in person meetings to connect and push migration health research forward.  We are looking to you, our network members, to suggest potential regional or international events or conferences that are migration, migration health or health of migrant focussed.  Please help us connect you in person.

Wishing you a happy holiday and a healthy and enriching 2019.

MHADRI Steering Committee

Paul Bukuluki
Rachel Burns
Paul Douglas
Chuck Hui
Dee Knipe
Ursula Trummer
Jo Vearey
Kolitha Wickramage

Subscribe to the MHADRI mailing list here

[NEWS] MHADRI interns working to map migration and health research

By Holly McCarthy and Pearl Agbenyezi, MHADRI/maHp interns

2016-maHp-complete-1000px

If the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) is trying to improve responses to migration and health in southern Africa by generating and communicating knowledge… who is trying to action this on a global scale? The Migration Health and Development Research Initiative (MHDRI) – that’s who!

Aimed at advancing collaboration between migration and health researchers, MHADRI – just like maHp – encourages the use of evidence-informed action to improve the health and wellbeing of those affected by migration. MHADRI is a network of active migration and health researchers focused on advancing ethical, inter-disciplinary research in these fields, with the hope of enhancing collaborations, resource accessibility and data sharing. MHADRI – of which the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) is secretariat – is a network committed to the meaningful representation of researchers in the global south, as well as the development and support of early-career researchers. However, in order to achieve its goals, the MHADRI network needs to engage in conversations with migration and health researchers to better understand the gaps that need to be filled.

Luckily, MHADRI has interns.

We are Pearl Agbenyezi and Holly McCarthy – students of the Ethnic and Migration Studies programme at the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO) at Linköping University in Sweden. So how did two Masters’ students studying in Northern Europe end up in South Africa writing a blog post for maHp?

Well, we are exchange students – currently interning as research assistants with MHADRI – at the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS) at the University of the Witwatersrand. After taking Professor Jo Vearey’s Psychosocial and Health Consequences of Migration and Displacement module at the ACMS, the opportunity arose for us to engage with migration and health challenges in a practical sense – a scoping project for MHADRI.

Pearl’s work involves talking to early-career migration and health researchers across the globe – some of whom are already MHADRI members, while others are looking to join – in order to gain an understanding of the motivations, challenges and opportunities available for early-career researchers. The goal is to establish how a network like MHADRI could connect these researchers, and provide a supportive platform for mentorship, capacity building and collaboration.

Meanwhile, Holly has been busy interviewing leading migration and health researchers in the global South regions. Through this ongoing scoping exercise, we hope to identify and map existing gaps in migration and health governance  research and access to resources  in order to determine how MHADRI can play a role in addressing these gaps. So far, our discussions with researchers in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bosnia and Uganda have revealed much about the informal networks that exist between researchers, as well as frustrations with migration and health governance in these regions. We will publish a report summarising our findings, and to profile the work and reflections of some of our MHADRI members.

We hope that these conversations will help to strengthen the MHADRI network with the capacity to address some of the challenges faced by migration and health researchers around the world. You can visit MHADRI to search for existing members, browse migration and health updates, and apply for membership yourself!

Do you have something to say? Projects such as these are only enriched by a greater depth and breadth of reflections from those working in the migration and health space. If you are an early-career researcher with insights to share, please contact Pearl at mhadri.network2@gmail.com. And if you are an established migration and health researcher working in the global South who is interested in discussing the gaps in migration and health research, governance and resources please contact Holly at mhadri.network1@gmail.com. We would love to hear from you!

[originally posted online at https://goo.gl/6q7wcF%5D

[Call for papers] Special Issue “The World in Crisis: Current Health Issues”

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “The World in Crisis: Current Health Issues” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Articles are invited on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to disaster (e.g., flood, drought, hurricanes, tsunami), child trafficking, domestic violence, sexual abuse, malnutrition, food poisoning, refugee health, overweight, diseases associated with global warming (e.g., malaria, west Nile virus, zika virus, chikungunya, dengue fever), access to health care, climate change, environment quality, disease outbreak, tobacco, substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, mental health, yellow fever, meningitis, diphtheria, cholera, and pandemic influenza.

We are especially interested in manuscripts that address local, regional and international collaboration and geopolitical solutions to complex public health crises occurring throughout the world.

Dr. Jimmy T. Efird
Dr. Pollie Bith-Melander
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

[PAPER] Detention is still harming children at the US border (2018)

Detention is still harming children at the US border

Hui, C. and D. Zion

BMJ 362: k3001

Migrant and Refugee Health in Malaysia (2017): Meeting Report

UNU-IIGH organized a 2-day workshop on Migrant and Refugee Health in Malaysia on 9-10 November 2017, with the support of the China Medical Board Foundation’s Equity Initiative. Over 40 participants from industry, medical professions, civil society and academia in Malaysia attended, including regional speakers presenting case studies of migrant health inclusion from Thailand’s Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) as well as several NGO service providers in Malaysia and Singapore. Participants identified gaps in knowledge and suggested practical steps forward to improve the evidence base in the Malaysia, which is detailed in these proceedings.

Additionally, an open access article reporting on the meeting was published in BMC Proceedings.

8-e1510718158456.jpg
Dr. Hartini Zunaidin (Yayasan Chow Kit), Dr. Muhammad Azrin Bin Mohd Asihin (MERCY Malaysia) and Ms. Sharifah Shakirah (Rohingya Women’s Development Network) with Dr. Raudah Yunus (University Malaya) responding to questions from participants. Photo: UNU-IIGH. Creative Commons BY-NC 2.0